The MOST Offers FREE Summer Camp! Spots Limited!

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

This in from the TACNY email list about a great summer opportunity at The MOST for students starting 9th grade this fall.

Students graduating 8th grade can learn about
environmental science by conducting field experiments

If you have a child who’s entering ninth grade in the fall, The MOST has the perfect camp to keep them thinking this summer: Honeywell Summer Science Week.

Students spend July 10-14 out in the field conducting real scientific research as they learn about factors that stress the Onondaga Lake watershed. They also learn what Honeywell has done to clean up the lake, which was once considered the most polluted lake in the country. Then students come back for a day July 19 to discuss their research and present what they learned.

Best of all, thanks to the generous sponsorship from Honeywell, the camp is FREE to participants!

To apply for Honeywell Summer Science Week, contact Michael Amadori or Peter Plumley as soon as possible. There are only 15 spaces left!

Technology Alliance of Central New York

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org and their Facebook page.

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique: “Get Your Head In The Clouds! Cloud Computing – Risks and Rewards”

Saturday – June 17, 9:30-11:00am

Milton J Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology – Syracuse, NY


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Please RSVP to jrcafe@tacny.org

Speaker

* Yuzhe (Richard) Tang PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of EECS, Syracuse University

Talk Overview

Cloud computing has penetrated our daily lives like never before. Cloud is essentially a virtual computer that executes commands and stores data when we watch TV, when our parents pay the rent online, and when we receive medical care. All these convenience factors, however, cannot be taken for granted. With an “evil” nature and a vulnerable system under the hood, a cloud provider such as Amazon can leak or corrupt our personal data. So how can we safely utilize the cloud that cannot be fully trusted? Explore the possibility and learn about the magic behind it with Dr. Tang.

Presenters

Dr. Yuzhe (Richard) Tang’s research is broad in scope, covering cyber-security and computer systems, with emphasis on applied cryptography, programming languages, operating systems and databases. Dr. Tang earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2014, and his M.Sc. and B.Sc. degrees from Fudan University, Shanghai, China. He is the author of more than 20 publications and is a recipient of the Best Paper awards in ACM/IEEE CCGrid 2015 and in IEEE Cloud 2012. In his spare time, he likes outdoor activities such as star gazing, bicycling, kayaking and jogging.

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique, a program for middle-school students founded in 2005, features discussions between scientists and students about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere and seeks to encourage students to consider careers in these areas. Students must be accompanied by an adult and can explore the MOST at no cost after the event.

Technology Alliance of Central New York

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

“June Stargazing In Upstate NY” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the Upstate NY Stargazing series, “June stargazing in Upstate NY: What to look for in the night skies this month,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com.

Direct Links: newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com

* With only three articles to go before the great total solar eclipse on August 21st of this year, we go into a little more about the geometry that gives us such fantastic eclipses right now, and how some big science (namely, the Apollo Missions) have given us evidence that such eclipses will not be around forever.

For the record, amateur astronomers reserved their rooms years and years ago in all the best places – if you’ve not figured out your flight plans around the 21st already, there is a seriously good chance that you’ll be stick driving to see the best view of totality.

Caption:Different as night and day, except for their apparent size. The partial solar eclipse on 21 February 2012 from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. (NASA/SDO/AIA).

* We continue our look north with Cepheus, the fourth of six constellations that are always visible in the nighttime sky from our latitude (readers then can guess where the next two articles are headed).

* The June Bootids do occur this month, but are usually a poor showing. We push forward into the summer months with a wealth of Messier observing (and attempt to do so with fresh content and not the rehashing of too much from last year’s articles).

Caption: Cepheus, a broken barn hovering over the throne of Cassiopeia this month. (Image made with Stellarium).