SU College Of Engineering And Computer Science Summer Research Internship Program

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

This in from the TACNY listserve – note the March 3rd deadline.

SU’s College of Engineering and Computer Science encourages current high school juniors from CNY to apply for our Summer Research Internship Program. This is an exciting opportunity for students interested in STEM fields!

The College of Engineering and Computer Science, with funding from alumni Thomas and Linda McCausland, have created engineering research opportunities for five talented rising high school seniorswho reside locally. This six-week non-residential program is an opportunity for students to work directly with SU research professors, graduate and undergraduate students on a discrete hands-on research project as part of ongoing research specific to each faculty mentor.

All laboratories will focus on the following learning outcomes for participating interns:
* participate in laboratory safety training
* learn laboratory and college level library research techniques
* develop a research plan
* maintain a laboratory notebook or equivalent
* analyze data
* display and present data in a poster form and explain poster information during an annual poster symposium

Interns will be selected through a competitive application process and receive a generous stipend for successfully completing the program and its requirements

Detailed information regarding the internship, applicant eligibility and requirements including the on-line application can be found on our new website: highschooleng.research.syr.edu. Completed applications must be submitted by 5:00 PM Friday, March 3, 2017.

For more information, please feel free to contact Carol Stokes-Cawley, Program Coordinator Summer Research Internship Program, at cestokes@syr.edu.

Technology Alliance of Central New York

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique: “Disease, Death And Destruction From Water Borne Bugs: The ‘Ghost Maps’ Of John Snow To The Problems Of Today”

Saturday, February 18, 9:30 – 11:00am

Milton J Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology – Syracuse, NY


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Speaker

Charles T. Driscoll, PhD, Distinguished and University Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Syracuse University

Talk Overview

We did not always know that water is a vehicle for disease. In 1858 in London there was a disease outbreak that was killing many people. No one could determine the cause. Enter the hero, John Snow and his “ghost maps“. By intellect and tenacity he solved the mystery and through the knowledge that followed his discovery millions of lives have been saved in the intervening years. There are many types of water pathogens, or disease causing organisms that have been discovered since the time of John Snow which we will discuss, including the toxic algae blooms we are experiencing today.

Biography

Charles T. Driscoll is a Distinguished and University Professor at Syracuse University. He received his BS from the University of Maine and MS and PhD from Cornell University. Driscoll’s research addresses the effects of disturbance on forest, freshwater and marine ecosystems, including air pollution (acid and mercury deposition), land-use, and climate change. Driscoll has testified at Congressional and state legislative committee hearings, and served on many local, national and international committees. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique

TACNY Junior Cafe Scientifique, a program for middle-school students founded in 2005, features discussions about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere and seeks to encourage students to consider careers in these areas. Students must be accompanied by an adult and can explore the MOST at no cost after the event.

Technology Alliance of Central New York

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

CNYO Brochure – An Observational Astronomy Facts And Figures Cheat Sheet

To cut to the downloading chase: Astronomy Facts And Figures Cheat Sheet V6.pdf

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

Those who’ve ever run an observing session have inevitably faced the most daunting of amateur astronomy outreach questions:

“Woah. How far away is that?!”

In the interest of having a rapid response to that and similar questions, the posted cheat sheet combines as much of the usual information that observers and attendees might want to know as can be fit in not-too-small font into groupings that fit on single pages (10, total).

An important word on the facts: To the very best of ability, all of the information has been checked and double-checked against available data online. To that end, all of the data as presented can be directly attributed to the following websites as of their content on 1 January 2017:

* astropixels.com/messier/messiercat.html – extra thanks to Fred Espenak for use permissions

* astropixels.com/stars/brightstars.html – extra thanks to Fred Espenak for use permissions

* www.amsmeteors.org/meteor-showers/2016-meteor-shower-list/

* www.dl1dbc.net/Meteorscatter/meteortopics.html

* nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/

* star.arm.ac.uk/~dja/shower/codes.html

And, of course:

* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_exceptional_asteroids

* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/88_modern_constellations

* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_meteor_showers

* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_brightest_stars

* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apparent_magnitude

* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellar_classification

The Observational Astronomy Cheat Sheet contains the following:

Page 1: The only two figures in the document, including the famous “finger how-to” for measuring distances in the night sky and a figure describing right ascension and declination (with values for many objects given in the tables).

Page 2: Moons And Planets – All of the standard information (and descriptions below) about the relative places of planets in the Solar System (distances, masses, temperatures, distances from Sun), then an extra column for our Moon.

Page 3: Best Meteor Showers – All of the categorized Class I, II, and III Meteor Showers throughout the year, including approximate peak dates, times, and directions.

Page 4: Marginal Meteor Showers – All of the categorized Class IV Meteor Showers (these are surely poor meteor showers for observing, but that fact that we’ve catalogued them there tells you how exhaustive astronomers have been in keeping track of periodicities in our day/nighttime sky).

Page 5: Winter And Spring Messier Objects – including abbreviations, NGC labels, types, distances (as best we know them), and Common Names.

Page 6: Summer And Autumn Messier Objects – including abbreviations, NGC labels, types, distances (as best we know them), and Common Names.

Page 7: Northern and Zodiacal Constellations – including family, origin, brightest star, and positional information.

Page 8: Southern Constellations – including family, origin, brightest star, and positional information.

Page 9: Top Asteroids – the best and brightest (and best identified), including distances, discovery information, and magnitudes (as available).

Page 10: Stars – the Top 50 brightest (with our Sun at its rightful position as #1), including constellation, magnitudes, distances, and mass and positional information.

And, without further ado…

Download Astronomy Facts And Figures Cheat Sheet V6.pdf