Summerwood Pediatrics Presents: “Be The Astronomer” At The MOST, 30 June 2018

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

A great event happening at The MOST at the end of the month from noon to 4:00 p.m.:

Be the Scientist” Saturdays allow visitors to learn, engage, and explore the activities of a different type of scientist each month. Visitors receive an explorer card to track progress through the program’s three steps: Learn, Engage, Explore. Step 1 (Learn) features a tabling exercise teaching the basic principles of the monthly scientist’s discipline. Visitors move to a different location for Step 2 (Engage), which features a tabling exercise including hands-on interaction in an activity the scientist might undertake in real life. Finally, visitors encounter Step 3 (Explore), which is an exploration of a MOST exhibit relating to the work of the monthly scientist. Make your way through each step successfully and have your explorer card punched to mark your completion. Complete 12 sessions to earn your special mystery prize! All are welcome to participate! Most suitable for children ages 6 and up.

June 30 – Be the Astronomer
July 28 – Be the Marine Biologist
August 25 – Be the Geologist
September 29 – Be the Nutritionist (Food & Exercise)

With luck, the touring Hubble exhibit will be available at the same time:

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope: New Views of the Universe is a 2,200 square-foot exhibit that immerses visitors in the magnificence and mystery of the Hubble mission and introduces the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be NASA’s premier observatory. The exhibit features a scale model of the Hubble Space Telescope as well as several “satellite” units that provide viewers with a hands-on experience with the same technology that allows Hubble to gaze at distant galaxies, and feature Hubble’s contributions to the exploration of planets, stars, galaxies and the universe.

International Astronomical Union 2018 Light Pollution Brochure – Available For Download

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

With thanks to George Normandin of the Kopernik Astronomical Society (and Art Cacciola for emphasizing the importance of getting this PDF distributed), we’re making mention here of the publication of a fairly recent (April, 2018) International Astronomical Union (IAU) report on Light Pollution.

The direct link and additional details are below.

As a more recent point of note, the recommendations of amber/yellow colors for “ecologically responsible and astronomically friendly LEDs” is a relevant extension to a June 2016 article in Sky and Telescope titled “Is Red Light Really Best?” where author Robert Dick presented quite compelling arguments for shifting your nighttime observing lights a bit towards amber.

2018 Light Pollution Brochure – Download

From the IAU website:

This publication is a compilation of important findings of experts worldwide in the area of light pollution. The information was gathered under the umbrella of the Cosmic Light programme, organized by IAU during the International Year of Light 2015. The goal of this brochure is to raise the profile of recent advancements in our understanding of light pollution, in particular regarding the use of LEDs, to support the astronomy community and increase public awareness of light pollution research.

You can download this brochure as a high resolution pdf or as a medium resolution pdf.

Credit: IAU Office for Astronomy Outreach

Updated Bob Piekiel Observing Schedule And June 15th Chittenango Falls Public Session Reminder

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

Quick reminder that the most recent post below still holds – feel free to RSVP with Chittenango Falls (so they know the early interest), otherwise our Facebook and Meetup event pages are also available.

Also: Bob has secured a few more observing sessions for the Summer at Baltimore Woods and Green Lakes. His complete observing list is available on his 2018 Observing Schedule page.