CNYO Observers Log: International Observe The Moon Night At Westhill School District, 12 October 2013

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

Larry Slosberg and Ryan Goodson took their New Moon Telescopes on the road to the Westhill School District for the October 12th International Observe The Moon Night (IOMN, facebook, twitter). With a fistful of our A Guide For Lunar Observing brochures in tow, both report that the near-or-exceeding 100 attendees were full of great questions and enjoyed close-up views of our nearest natural satellite.

CNYO was delighted to be a part of this local IOMN activity and strongly encourage other schools and local groups to do the same. The Moon is the easiest observing target we have, good at all magnifications (including no magnification) and all times of year. It has been a test for physical theories, the guide for calendars throughout human history, unwitting recipient of meteor impacts (still!) that might have made random Tuesdays quite hectic on Earth, muse of artists and musicians alike, and all the light needed for many a midnight hike. If you missed the “official” IOMN session, grab a pair of binos soon and give the Moon a gander!

Below are a collection of images from Larry Slosberg’s observing station (and one great image of the Moon), courtesy of Michelle Marzynski. Click on any image for the full-size version.

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While Larry kept the festivities mostly Moon-centric at his scope, Ryan reports having put many of the best objects in the mid-autumn night sky on full display, including The Andromeda Galaxy (M31), the globular cluster M13 in Hercules, the double stars Albireo (a colored pair in Cygnus) and Mizar/Alcor (a double that becomes a triple at moderate magnification in Ursa Major), the open cluster M39 (“everyone’s fave it seemed” – L.S.) in Cygnus, and finally the Ring Nebula (M57) and the Double-Double in Lyra.

For myself, I celebrated IOMN early from the comfort of a window seat at 36,000 ft. With luck, I hope to be on the ground and running yet another scope for next year’s IOMN session!

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