Author Archives: Damian Allis

9th Annual Girls Summit – STEM Career Exploration Day, 29 April 2017

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

This in from the TACNY list. One week to go before the 2017 Girls Summit, held on the SUNY ESF campus this Saturday. Please forward this along to anyone you think might be interested!

Details

Girls Summit is a career exploration day for girls in grades 6-10 on Saturday April 29th, 2017 at the College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) from 8:30 AM – 3:30 PM. The event’s GPS address is 1000 Irving Ave.

Girls Summit is organized by Girls Inc. at the YWCA in collaboration with ESF, Syracuse University, Syracuse University’s STEP (Science, Technology Entry Program), and New York State CSTEP (Collegiate Science & Technology Entry Program). Participants will attend hands-on workshops about a variety of STEM topics throughout the day and a panel discussion about the high school-to-college transition will close the day.

This event aims to (1) spark the spirit, trigger the imagination and encourage young women to consider new and exciting career opportunities; (2) increase a girl’s interest in math, science and technology and in persistence with school; (3) provide girls with opportunities to meet and form personal contacts with women working in non- traditional fields; and (4) provide hands-on learning about alternative careers in a format that is committed to benefiting girls of all ethnicities, races, religions, abilities, and backgrounds.

GIRLS SUMMIT SCHEDULE

8:30 AM – 9:30 AM: Registration
9:40 – 9:55 AM: Keynote Speaker
10:00 – 10:10 AM: Pre-Survey
10:10 – 10:55 AM: Workshop 1
11:00 AM – 11:45 AM: Workshop 2
12:00 PM – 12:30 PM: Lunch (will be provided on-site)
12:40 – 1:25 PM: Workshop 3
1:30 – 2:10 PM: Workshop 4
2:10 – 2:15 PM: Post-Survey
2:30 – 3:15 PM: College Readiness Panel Discussion
3:15 – 3:30: Closing Ceremony & Door Prizes!

PLEASE NOTE: Your registration will not be considered complete until a registration fee of $5.00 is made to the YWCA by cash, credit, check, or money order. Call our main office at (315) 424-0040 to make a payment by credit card. Please make checks out to “YWCA Syracuse & Onondaga County” and drop off in person or by mail to 401 Douglas St. Syracuse, NY 13203. If mailing in a payment, please include contact information for the participant. Payment may be made on the day of the event, however it is strongly encouraged to pre-pay via the above options.

If you have any questions please contact Liz Wierbinski at lwierbinskiywca@centralny.twcbc.com or by phone at 315-424-0040.

Technology Alliance of Central New York

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

Spring Constellations And Planet Observation – CNYO At Beaver Lake Nature Center, 27 April 2017

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

I am pleased to announce that the first official CNYO session for 2017 will be held next week (or the week after, weather-pending) at one of our most regular observing locations. Bob Piekiel and Larry Slosberg will be hosting at Beaver Lake from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. at the northern tip of the big loop (just aim for the main parking lot).

The event is free with Beaver Lake admission (click HERE for the direct event link), but they do request advanced registration. If interested, please call Beaver Lake Nature Center at 315-638-2519 or send an email to blnc@ongov.net.


View Larger Map

Unfortunately, the event description seems to have been taken from our last Beaver Lake session – Venus won’t be present by event start (having set about three hours before sunset), but a sliver of a crescent moon will be visible for most of the session in close proximity to Mars. Jupiter remains an excellent summer scope target this year and for several years to come.

This outdoor lecture by CNY Observers will describe the history of the spring constellations and offer tips for remembering their relative positions. The moon will be the featured object for the night, with Jupiter and Venus also prominent, making for great views with the telescopes that will be present. (Cloud date is May 4.)

“Upstate NY Stargazing In April” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the Upstate NY Stargazing series, “Upstate NY Stargazing in April: Comet Hunting and the Lyrid Meteor Shower,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com.

Direct Link: newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2017/03/…the_lyrid_meteor_shower.html

Direct Link: syracuse.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2017/03/…the_lyrid_meteor_shower.html

* We extend last month’s discussion of Messier Objects by briefly discussing the objects Messier was most keen on finding – comets. Many thanks to Brad Loperfido for the kind reprint permissions of his excellent Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak et al. catch (below).

Caption: One-hour motion of Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak (left) within Ursa Major, including M108 (the “Surfboard Galaxy”, upper right) and M97 (the Owl Nebula, lower right). (Image by NY photographer Brad Loperfido on March 22, 2017)

* We continue our look north with Ursa Minor, the second of six constellations that are always visible in the nighttime sky from our latitude (readers then can guess where the next four articles are headed).

* This month, we await the Lyrid Meteor Shower, which peaks on the early morning of April 22nd. The Lyrids peak in the presence of a sliver of a waning crescent Moon – this is excellent news for observers annoyed by the many washed-out 2016 meteor showers, as the Moon will not be bright enough to dull bright Lyrid trails.

Caption: The Lyrid Meteor Shower radiant, roughly between the bright star Vega and the southern elbow of Hercules. Pending the skies and brightness, you may even be able to see Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak between the head of Draco and arm of Hercules that night. Click for a larger view.