Category Archives: Upstate Ny Stargazing

“Stargazing In Upstate NY” Has Gone Weekly (For Summer, Anyway) – First Two Weekly Articles Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The problem with weekly posts is that you get behind in your announcements that much faster. I’m pleased to report that the “Stargazing In Upstate New York” series has gone weekly for the Summer at syracuse.com and newyorkupstate.com, just in time for nighttime temperatures that most everyone can agree with.

The June 30th – July 7th article can be found at:

* syracuse.com/outdoors/…what_to_see_in_the_night_skies_june_30_to_july_7.html

* newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/…what_to_see_in_the_night_skies_june_30_to_july_7.html

The July 7th – July 14th article can be found at:

* syracuse.com/outdoors/…what_to_see_in_the_night_skies_july_7_to_14.html

* newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/…what_to_see_in_the_night_skies_july_7_to_14.html

The second article features great shot of M13 from Rochester, NY astrophotographer Gary Opitz (shown above. M13, not Gary). For more of Gary’s work, check out his astrobin page at: http://www.astrobin.com/full/300709/C/

“June Stargazing In Upstate NY” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the Upstate NY Stargazing series, “June stargazing in Upstate NY: What to look for in the night skies this month,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com.

Direct Links: newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com

* With only three articles to go before the great total solar eclipse on August 21st of this year, we go into a little more about the geometry that gives us such fantastic eclipses right now, and how some big science (namely, the Apollo Missions) have given us evidence that such eclipses will not be around forever.

For the record, amateur astronomers reserved their rooms years and years ago in all the best places – if you’ve not figured out your flight plans around the 21st already, there is a seriously good chance that you’ll be stick driving to see the best view of totality.

Caption:Different as night and day, except for their apparent size. The partial solar eclipse on 21 February 2012 from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. (NASA/SDO/AIA).

* We continue our look north with Cepheus, the fourth of six constellations that are always visible in the nighttime sky from our latitude (readers then can guess where the next two articles are headed).

* The June Bootids do occur this month, but are usually a poor showing. We push forward into the summer months with a wealth of Messier observing (and attempt to do so with fresh content and not the rehashing of too much from last year’s articles).

Caption: Cepheus, a broken barn hovering over the throne of Cassiopeia this month. (Image made with Stellarium).

“Upstate NY Stargazing In May” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the Upstate NY Stargazing series, “Upstate NY Stargazing in May: A Meteor Shower and Preparations for the Solar Eclipse,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com.

Direct Links: newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com

* With only four articles to go before the great total solar eclipse on August 21st of this year, we’ve shifted gears in the article opener from great nighttime observing to great daytime observing. You’ll be seeing more and more from all kinds of news sources as the data approaches, and CNYO is figuring out what we plan to do for the event (besides a few scheduled eclipses lectures in the CNY area in the weeks before).

For the record, amateur astronomers reserved their rooms years and years ago in all the best places – if you’ve not figured out your flight plans around the 21st already, there is a seriously good chance that you’ll be stick driving to see the best view of totality.

Caption: The transit of Venus across the Sun on June 5/6, 2012. By NASA/SDO, AIA.

* We continue our look north with Cassiopeia, the third of six constellations that are always visible in the nighttime sky from our latitude (readers then can guess where the next three articles are headed).

* This month, we await the Eta Aquariid (or Eta Aquarid, or eta Aquarid… Halley’s Comet doesn’t care what you call it) Meteor Shower, which peaks on the early mornings of May 5/6. In doing the homework for the article, I found it interesting to note that we’re not entirely sure that this meteor shower originates from particles attributable to Halley’s Comet, the object we most associate with this shower. It is possible that Halley’s Comet is indirectly responsible for the particles by being directly responsible for the redirection of the debris from a different object in to the current Eta Aquariid path.

Caption: The Eta Aquariid radiant, complete with Venus, Saturn, the newly returned Summer Triangle, and one perfectly-placed 5 a.m. ISS flyover on the morning of May 6. Image made with Stellarium. Click for a larger view.