Category Archives: News

ICYMI – “NASA Unveils New Searchable Video, Audio And Imagery Library For The Public”

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

In the event that the original announcement made it past you, I wanted to clear the following NASA News of out CNYO’s Inbox and spread the linkage around. The original announcement was released on 28 March 2017 (RELEASE 17-035), followed soon after after by a posting to the great Open Culture website (www.openculture.com – there’s an equally great discussion about the library on the Open Culture website HERE).

Consider your desktop background needs fulfilled.

As eye candy for the post, I found the single image of NGC 4565 – my personal favorite and one of the great “work for” eye candy galaxies in medium-sized telescopes.

NASA officially has launched a new resource to help the public search and download out-of-this-world images, videos and audio files by keyword and metadata searches from NASA.gov. The NASA Image and Video Library website consolidates imagery spread across more than 60 collections into one searchable location.

images.nasa.gov

NASA Image and Video Library allows users to search, discover and download a treasure trove of more than 140,000 NASA images, videos and audio files from across the agency’s many missions in aeronautics, astrophysics, Earth science, human spaceflight, and more. Users now can embed content in their own sites and choose from multiple resolutions to download. The website also displays the metadata associated with images.

Users can browse the agency’s most recently uploaded files, as well as discover historic and the most popularly searched images, audio files and videos. Other features include:

* Automatically scales the interface for mobile phones and tablets
* Displays the EXIF/camera data that includes exposure, lens used, and other information, when available from the original image
* Allows for easy public access to high resolution files
* All video includes a downloadable caption file

NASA Image and Video Library’s Application Programmers Interface (API) allows automation of imagery uploads for NASA, and gives members of the public the ability to embed content in their own sites and applications. This public site runs on NASA’s cloud native “infrastructure-as-a-code” technology enabling on-demand use in the cloud.

The library is not comprehensive, but rather provides the best of what NASA makes publicly available from a single point of presence on the web. Additionally, it is a living website, where new and archival images, video and audio files continually will be added.

For more information about NASA’s activities, visit: www.nasa.gov

Summer Research Opportunity – Do Research @ SUNY-ESF and Earn Credits

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

This in from the TACNY email list concerning summer research opportunities with the MELNHE (Multiple Element Limitation in Northern Hardwood Ecosystems) Project, which you can read more about at their website: www.esf.edu/melnhe/. As a university academic, I highly recommended getting motivated students (of any age) engaged in any and all such activities (their brains and CVs will thank them)!

“Be part of the research team working on a forest nutrient project at SUNY-ESF. Earn up to 3 college credits at no cost to you. Lab work includes leaf identification and sorting, soil processing, building sap flow sensors and managing data. Weekend and daytime opportunities available. Contact Camila Ferguson at cofergus@syr.edu or Maura H. Stefl at mhstefl@esf.edu.”

Technology Alliance of Central New York

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org and their Facebook page.

“Confronting The Big Questions: Highlights of Modern Astronomy” – Starting July 17th At Coursera

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The following was forwarded along to several local astronomy group mail lists by CNYO/SAS/ASRAS member Dr. David Wormuth. The Coursera course, “Confronting The Big Questions: Highlights of Modern Astronomy,” is hosted right in our own neighborhood – featuring University of Rochester professor of astrophysics (and NPR science mainstay) Dr. Adam Frank (twitter).

You’ve no excuse for not learning something interesting this summer.

Click on the following link for all of the details and to enroll – https://www.coursera.org/learn/astronomy. Coursera will certainly not complain if you wish to enroll through the paying option ($49) to support the cause, but you can also sign up for the free option (without a completion certificate at the end) when you enroll for the course.

From the course website: https://www.coursera.org/learn/astronomy/home/welcome

About this Course

An introduction to modern astronomy’s most important questions. The four sections of the course are Planets and Life in The Universe; The Life of Stars; Galaxies and Their Environments; The History of The Universe.