TACNY John Edson Sweet Lecture Series – Technology That Enables The IIBMST To Conduct Medical Research…

Wednesday, March 13 2013

SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry, 146 Baker Hall


2013march1_tacnygoodmanDr. Steven R. Goodman, Executive Director, International Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Technology (IIBMST) will present “Technology that enables the IIBMST to conduct medical research and the development of biomedical products without walls, geographic, or scientific boundaries.” People interested in learning more about biotechnologies are invited to attend the free TACNY Sweet Lecture presentation on Wednesday, March 13, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Room 146 of Baker Hall on the SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry campus. Networking starts at 5:30 p.m., the speaker is introduced at 6 p.m., the presentation is slated to run from 6:15 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and the event ends at 8 p.m. following questions from the audience. Admission is free and open to the public. Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by emailing sweet.lecture@tacny.org by March 8, 2013.

Dr. Goodman is also currently the Vice President for Research/Dean, College of Graduate Studies, a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology as well as Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at SUNY Upstate Medical University. He has over 35 years of collaborative international medical research from molecular and cell biology to infectious diseases. He has patented a novel Sickle Cell Anemia Treatment technology, authored a long list of books and research papers, and advised dozens of post graduate and postdoctoral researchers who are making significant contributions to understanding and solving medical challenges. In 2011 Dr. Goodman was the recipient of the Distinguished Scientist Award from the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Dr. Goodman earned his PhD in biochemistry at the St. Louis University Medical School and his BS in Chemistry at SUNY Stony Brook.

The IIBMST is a diverse group of international faculty that integrates expertise in basic and applied biological, physical, computer and engineering sciences to advance science, medical research and the development of biomedical products. It is an institute without walls, geographic or scientific boundaries that facilitates collaborative research within the areas of overlap among academic discipline. The IIBMST includes focus groups for cancer; diabetes; disorders of the nervous system; infectious diseases and emerging pathogens; pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine; and stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

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Click HERE for a full-sized PDF.

Click HERE For An Event Parking Pass.

Technology Alliance of Central New York

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.

For more information about TACNY, visit www.tacny.org.

Tenth Annual NEAF Solar Star Party (NSSP) Announcement – Direct From Barlow Bob

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

2013february24_nssp_bbdgaEast Coast amateur astronomers have been gearing up for NEAF all Winter long (see our original announcement HERE). One of the special extra NEAF events, now in its 10th year, is the NEAF Solar Star Party (NSSP), featuring several solar-safe scopes, many well-versed solar observers, and hopefully an active solar surface as we approach solarmax.

The host of the NSSP is none other than Barlow Bob (the brightly lit one pictured at right with the author at NEAF 2011), a solar-centric observer who has graced several CNY locations in the past few years both with truly remarkable views of our nearest star and his great knowledge of optics, light properties, and the Sun itself. Provided the skies are at all reasonable, you can be guaranteed of some excellent views of prominences and sunspots.

The official announcement from Barlow Bob is below:

EXPERIENCE THE GOLDEN AGE OF
AMATEUR SOLAR ASTRONOMY

The Rockland Astronomy Club Is Proud To Present

The 2013 Tenth Annual NEAF SOLAR STAR PARTY

APRIL 20 AND 21, 2013

At Rockland Community College – Suffern, New York

NEAF attendees are invited to observe the Sun with attitude in different
wavelengths, through a variety of solar filters and spectroscopes.

Join us, for two days of solar observing at NEAF 2013.

No star party entrance fee, or registration required.

BRING A PIECE OF CLEAR SKY TO SHARE
WITH VENDORS AND FELLOW PHOTON-DEPRIVED
AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS.

For further information, please visit our website:

www.rocklandastronomy.com & neafsolar.com

NASA Space Place – The Art of Space Imagery

Poster’s Note: One of the many under-appreciated aspects of NASA is the extent to which it publishes quality science content for children and Ph.D.’s alike. NASA Space Place has been providing general audience articles for quite some time that are freely available for download and republishing. Your tax dollars help promote science! The following article was provided for reprinting in January, 2013.

By Diane K. Fisher

2013february2_spaceplaceWhen you see spectacular space images taken in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope and other non-visible-light telescopes, you may wonder where those beautiful colors came from? After all, if the telescopes were recording infrared or ultraviolet light, we wouldn’t see anything at all. So are the images “colorized” or “false colored”?

No, not really. The colors are translated. Just as a foreign language can be translated into our native language, an image made with light that falls outside the range of our seeing can be “translated” into colors we can see. Scientists process these images so they can not only see them, but they can also tease out all sorts of information the light can reveal. For example, wisely done color translation can reveal relative temperatures of stars, dust, and gas in the images, and show fine structural details of galaxies and nebulae.

Spitzer’s Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), for example, is a four-channel camera, meaning that it has four different detector arrays, each measuring light at one particular wavelength. Each image from each detector array resembles a grayscale image, because the entire detector array is responding to only one wavelength of light. However, the relative brightness will vary across the array.

So, starting with one detector array, the first step is to determine what is the brightest thing and the darkest thing in the image. Software is used to pick out this dynamic range and to re-compute the value of each pixel. This process produces a grey-scale image. At the end of this process, for Spitzer, we will have four grayscale images, one for each for the four IRAC detectors.

Matter of different temperatures emit different wavelengths of light. A cool object emits longer wavelengths (lower energies) of light than a warmer object. So, for each scene, we will see four grayscale images, each of them different.

Normally, the three primary colors are assigned to these gray-scale images based on the order they appear in the spectrum, with blue assigned to the shortest wavelength, and red to the longest. In the case of Spitzer, with four wavelengths to represent, a secondary color is chosen, such as yellow. So images that combine all four of the IRAC’s infrared detectors are remapped into red, yellow, green, and blue wavelengths in the visible part of the spectrum.

Download a new Spitzer poster of the center of the Milky Way. On the back is a more complete and colorfully-illustrated explanation of the “art of space imagery.” Go to spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/#milky-way.

This article was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

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Caption: This image of M101 combines images from four different telescopes, each detecting a different part of the spectrum. Red indicates infrared information from Spitzer’s 24-micron detector, and shows the cool dust in the galaxy. Yellow shows the visible starlight from the Hubble telescope. Cyan is ultraviolet light from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope, which shows the hottest and youngest stars. And magenta is X-ray energy detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, indicating incredibly hot activity, like accretion around black holes.

About NASA Space Place

The goal of the NASA Space Place is “to inform, inspire, and involve children in the excitement of science, technology, and space exploration.” More information is available at their website: http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/