Open Culture – Astronaut Takes Amazing Self Portrait in Space

The following was posted on 22 December 2012 at the great website Open Culture – “The best free cultural & educational media on the web.” The image, described below, is available for direct download from the Astronomy Picture Of The Day archive HERE. For an enlightening afternoon of reading, consider checking out the many articles at Open Culture in the Astronomy category.

By Dan Colman

Taken at the International Space Station by astronaut Aki Hoshide (Japan), this awe-inspiring self portrait brings into one frame “the Sun, the Earth, two portions of a robotic arm, an astronaut’s spacesuit, the deep darkness of space, and the unusual camera taking the picture.” You’ll want to click the image above (or this link) to view the picture dubbed “Orbiting Astronaut Self-Portrait” in a worthy larger format.

Find other self-portraits taken in space here and here. And visit NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day for more striking images each and every day.

via @coudal

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2013 Cherry Springs Star Party Announcement – June 6th – 9th

Central New York is fortunate to have several locations within reasonable driving distance for observing the Night Sky with, as Barlow Bob calls it, “attitude.” One of the best locations for both dedicated observing and meeting fellow amateur astronomers (and their equipment) is the annual Cherry Springs Star Party, held this year from June 6th to 9th. Cherry Springs State Park is just outside of Coudersport, a leisurely 3.5 hour drive to Northwestern Pennsylvania. Ryan Goodson and I (Damian) enjoyed two nights of great skies, an unbelievable assortment of factory and homemade scopes, several lectures on topics of astronomical interest, and a great weekend with members of the Kopernik Astronomical Society at the 2012 Star Party. Registration is now open for 2013! Details from the official announcement are provided below. The Registration PDF can be downloaded HERE.

Hello friends

Mark your calendars now for this summer’s prime astronomy experience, the Cherry Springs Star Party in beautiful Potter County, PA. Make your plans now for a wonderful astronomy vacation under the darkest skies in the Northeast. Enjoy old and new astronomy friends. Families will enjoy the fun, too. Nearby Lyman Run State Park has a great lake and beach area for relaxing. They also provide shower facilities for those who are camping.

Registration for this years star party is currently open. A registration form is attached to this email. Currently, the website for the star party is being reconstructed, so PayPal registration as of this time is currently unavailable. We are working hard on the website and hope to have it up in operation shortly. Registration by mail is currently open. You may send in your registration at any time.

A Facebook page for this years star party has been created for up-to-date information regarding speakers, vendors, door prizes and weather updates. You do NOT need a Facebook account to access this page and the material on this page. The Facebook page will be updated periodically until the day of the star party.

A update email will be sent out closer to the star party with a list of all the vendors, door prizes and other information that becomes available.

Clear Skies,
Max Byerly
Trustee,
Astronomical Society of Harrisburg
astrohbg.org

Jim Richardson – Our Vanishing Night: Light Pollution

Our world, for better or worse, is increasingly illuminated as cities grow and populations develop once unused land. To the amateur astronomer, light pollution is definitely a change for the worse, as those trying to observe the faintest and most distant objects find themselves either competing with ambient light or driving (or flying) to ever more distant locations away from the glow of the cities. The Syracuse University Lecture Series (lectures.syr.edu) will be featuring a talk on March 19th by renowned photographer Jim Richardson on the subject of Light Pollution. Details are below.

Jim Richardson – Our Vanishing Night: Light Pollution

March 19, 2013 7:30 pm, Hendricks Chapel

2012jan17_jim_richardson_2Jim Richardson is a photographer for National Geographic Magazine and a contributing editor of its sister publication, TRAVELER Magazine. Richardson has photographed more than 25 stories for National Geographic. His work takes him around the world, from the tops of volcanic peaks to below the surface of swamps and wetlands. ABC News Nightline produced a story about the long process of assembling a National Geographic coverage by following Richardson in the field and at National Geographic Society headquarters in Washington, D.C. In addition to his color photography, Richardson has built a distinguished body of black-and-white documentary work about rural Kansas life. His audiovisual presentation, “Reflections From a Wide Spot in the Road,” has toured internationally. A 22-page story about his 30 years of photographing life in the north central Kansas town of Cuba, population 230, was published in National Geographic and featured twice by CBS News Sunday Morning, most recently in May 2004. His 1979 study of adolescence, “High School USA,” is now considered a photo essay classic and is used in college classrooms. Richardson speaks nationally and internationally. He lives in Lindsborg, Kansas, where his work is featured at his gallery, Small World.

What is University Lectures

The University Lectures has brought to the Syracuse University campus and the Central New York community some of the world’s most dynamic, influential and inspiring movers and shakers. Previous guests have been world-renowned academicians, architects, designers, writers, business and media experts, and statesmen, who have all helped to shape the world in which we live.