Sweet Science Series – Lockheed Martin Overview And Manufacturing And Test Facilities Tour

October 15th, 6:00-7:30 pm

RSVP By Tomorrow, October 7th

Refreshments at 5:30 pm

Lockheed Martin, 497 Electronics Pkwy, Syracuse, NY 13221 


The Sweet Science Series will be hosting an event at Lockheed Martin in Liverpool, NY.  The event will include a brief overview of the Lockheed Martin site, followed by a walking tour of the manufacturing and test facilities. 

People interested in learning more about the Lockheed Martin Syracuse facility are invited to attend the free Sweet Science Series presentation on Tuesday, October 15th, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Lockheed Martin, 497 Electronics Pkwy, Syracuse, NY 13221. Admission is free and open to the public. Light snacks will be served at 5:30pm. Please note that due to security considerations, all visitors must be 18 or over, and no walk-in visitors will be allowed. RSVP to sweet.science@tacny.org by October 7th. RSVPs must include the following information for all visitors:

  • First and last name
  • Company affiliation
  • Citizenship type, and citizenship country
  • Country of birth
  • Statement declaring the attendee is 18 or over

Additionally, foreign nationals must provide passport country, passport number and expiration date.

Presenter Information

Dr. Michael (Mike) Leone is Director of Product Engineering and Advanced Materials for Lockheed Martin’s Rotary and Mission Systems (RMS) division.  In this position, Dr. Leone oversees product development across the enterprise, partnering with the chief engineers, Center of Excellence senior leadership team, and RMS staff to achieve all program, and Engineering and Technology goals.

About Sweet Science Series

TACNY John Edson Sweet Lectures, a program founded in 1913, is now called the Sweet Science Series and features discussions about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere for adults of all levels of technical understanding. A minimum of six free and open to the public presentations are held each year.

About TACNY

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York. For more information, see www.tacny.org

NASA Night Sky Notes: Find Strange Uranus In Aries

Poster’s Note: One of the many under-appreciated aspects of NASA is the extent to which it publishes quality science content for children and Ph.D.’s alike. Your tax dollars help promote science! The following article was provided for reprinting by the Night Sky Network in October, 2019.

By David Prosper

Most of the planets in our solar system are bright and easily spotted in our night skies. The exceptions are the ice giant planets: Uranus and Neptune. These worlds are so distant and dim that binoculars or telescopes are almost always needed to see them. A great time to search for Uranus is during its opposition on October 28, since the planet is up almost the entire night and at its brightest for the year.

The bright three points of the Summer Triangle are among the first stars you can see after sunset: Deneb, Vega, and Altair.  The Summer Triangle is called an asterism, as it’s not an official constellation, but still a striking group of stars. However, the Triangle is the key to spotting multiple constellations! Its three stars are themselves the brightest in their respective constellations: Deneb, in Cygnus the Swan; Vega, in Lyra the Harp; and Altair, in Aquila the Eagle. That alone would be impressive, but the Summer Triangle also contains two small constellations inside its lines, Vulpecula the Fox and Sagitta the Arrow. There is even another small constellation just outside its borders: diminutive Delphinus the Dolphin. The Summer Triangle is huge!

Search for Uranus in the space beneath the stars of Aries the Ram and above Cetus the Whale. These constellations are found west of more prominent Taurus the Bull and Pleiades star cluster. You can also use the Moon as a guide! Uranus will be just a few degrees north of the Moon the night of October 14, close enough to fit both objects into the same binocular field of view.  However, it will be much easier to see dim Uranus by moving the bright Moon just out of sight. If you’re using a telescope, zoom in as much as possible once you find Uranus; 100x magnification and greater will reveal its small greenish disc, while background stars will remain points.

Try this observing trick from a dark sky location. Find Uranus with your telescope or binoculars, then look with your unaided eyes at the patch of sky where your equipment is aimed. Do you see a faint star where Uranus should be? That’s not a star; you’re actually seeing Uranus with your naked eye! The ice giant is just bright enough near opposition – magnitude 5.7 – to be visible to observers under clear dark skies. It’s easier to see this ghostly planet unaided after first using an instrument to spot it, sort of like “training wheels” for your eyes. Try this technique with other objects as you observe, and you’ll be amazed at what your eyes can pick out.

By the way, you’ve spotted the first planet discovered in the modern era! William Herschel discovered Uranus via telescope in 1781, and Johan Bode confirmed its status as a planet two years later. NASA’s Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to visit this strange world, with a brief flyby in 1986. It revealed a strange, severely tilted planetary system possessing faint dark rings, dozens of moons, and eerily featureless cloud tops. Subsequent observations of Uranus from powerful telescopes like Hubble and Keck showed its blank face was temporary, as powerful storms were spotted, caused by dramatic seasonal changes during its 84-year orbit. Uranus’s wildly variable seasons result from a massive collision billions of years ago that tipped the planet to its side.

Discover more about NASA’s current and future missions of exploration of the distant solar system and beyond at nasa.gov

The path of Uranus in October is indicated by an arrow; its position on October 14 is circled. The wide dashed circle approximates the field of view from binoculars or a finderscope. Image created with assistance from Stellarium.
Composite images taken of Uranus in 2012 and 2014 by the Hubble Space Telescope, showcasing its rings and auroras. More at bit.ly/uranusauroras  Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, L. Lamy / Observatoire de Paris

The Night Sky Network program supports astronomy clubs across the USA dedicated to astronomy outreach. Visit nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov to find local clubs, events, and more!

International Observe The Moon Night – 5 October 2019

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

Announcements for IOMN 2019 have started coming into our inbox. Whether an event is hosted in the area or you just decide to enjoy the view from your backyard, the moon.nasa.gov page has plenty of information, including maps, event history, and details about the focus of this year’s event – the continued celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing.

About IOMN

International Observe the Moon Night is an annual worldwide public event that encourages observation and appreciation of the Moon. All are invited to observe the Moon, learn about NASA planetary science and exploration, and celebrate cultural and personal connections to our nearest neighbor. Each year, thousands of people participate at museums, planetaria, schools, universities, observatories, parks, businesses, and backyards around the world. Anyone can participate. All you need to do is look up! Any astronomy club, interested group, or individual can host an event; events range from small family gatherings to community events that draw hundreds of visitors!

This Year’s Theme

In 2019, we are celebrating the Apollo 50th Anniversary. 1969 marks the first time humans set foot the Moon, when Apollo 11 landed on the Moon’s surface. The anniversary presents a unique opportunity to discuss past, present, and future lunar and planetary science and exploration and to celebrate all of the people who participated and shared in this human triumph.

See moon.nasa.gov/observe-the-moon/annual-event/overview/ for more information and event hosting opportunities.