Tag Archives: Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project

Weather Update For International SUNday On The Onondaga Creekwalk – Scheduled For Saturday Afternoon, 4 to 6 p.m.

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

Weather update: The forecast for CNY does not look promising for the official Int’l SUNDay on the 21st, so we’re going to instead run a session on Saturday afternoon at our usual downtown location. We’ll be providing a final weather update on Saturday, 12:00 p.m.

11174816_10155510931665088_9158140535153847873_nWith special thanks to Stephen W. Ramsden, The Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project, Rainbow Symphony and Lunt Solar Systems, CNYO’s second hosting of International SUNday is going to include (for the first 100 people, anyway) an extra dose of solar safety. Stephen et al. have made available 100 solar glasses to send off to organizations hosting International SUNday events!

CNYO ran a session for International SUNday on the Onondaga Creekwalk last June 22nd (see the observing log HERE), complete with H-alpha and Baader scopes (and we even had a good day for it, which is a bit of a rarity in CNY). I learned about the event from Stephen’s talk at NEAF 2014, where I found his lecture to be equally informative and inspiring.

I urge you to check out the website and Facebook page for the Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project – the amount of outreach Stephen does is tremendous (I am also happy to direct your attention to the Donate Button on the Project’s website to show a little love).

We’ll again host the session along the Armory Square slice of the Creekwalk – again next to Walt The Loch West Monster.

We hope you can join us on Saturday, June 20st in giving a little extra attention to our nearest star and reason why we’re all here!

June 21st International SUNday Session & A Major Kudos To The Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project

Greetings fellow astrophiles,

11174816_10155510931665088_9158140535153847873_n

I think the image about covers it.

With special thanks to Stephen W. Ramsden, The Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project, Rainbow Symphony and Lunt Solar Systems, CNYO’s second hosting of International SUNday is going to include (for the first 100 people, anyway) an extra dose of solar safety. Stephen et al. have made available 100 solar glasses to send off to organizations hosting International SUNday events – and we’re anxiously awaiting a box of them!

CBSAP_Large_Logo_White_ShadowCNYO ran a session for International SUNday on the Onondaga Creekwalk last June 22nd (see the observing log HERE), complete with H-alpha and Baader scopes (and we even had a good day for it, which is a bit of a rarity in CNY). I learned about the event from Stephen’s talk at NEAF 2014, where I found his lecture to be equally informative and inspiring.

I urge you to check out the website and Facebook page for the Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project – the amount of outreach Stephen does is tremendous (I am also happy to direct your attention to the Donate Button on the Project’s website to show a little love).

We’re getting the attending scope list together presently and will have another announcement or two (and scheduled Facebook and meetup events) shortly. I expect we’ll again host the session along the Armory Square slice of the Creekwalk – again next to Walt The Loch West Monster.

Stay tuned – and we hope you can join us on SUNday, June 21st in giving a little extra attention to our nearest star and reason why we’re all here!

CNYO Saw The March 20th Total Eclipse With Barlow Bob Shining Bright

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

It’s almost impossible in today’s super-connected world to not see astronomical events, even when they’re several time zones away. The March 20th total eclipse over the UK and Northern Europe was certainly evidence of that, with video, aerial video, and thousands and thousands of pictures taken (see the gallery on this eclipse’s wikipedia page for a nice summary).

As a fun aside, the visit summary for the last few weeks is shown below, courtesy of our WordPress Jetpack plug-in.

2015march23_eclipse_peak

As you can see, we’re usually in the 50’s and 60’s every day (mostly directed from search engines). On March 20th, we spiked like gamma ray burst, reaching 328 visitors. A noticeable bump that returned to normal on the 23rd.

2015march21_march20stats_detail

The large number of visitors (219) all seemed to favor a single page – the late, great Barlow Bob’s two articles on the benefits and use of the Sunspotter. I’ve no idea if the Sunspotter is a big hit in Europe or if people were simply searching frantically for anything solar safety and eclipse-related, but the numbers (for the 20th, anyway), don’t lie. It is my suspicion that many a google’er came across one article or another from Barlow Bob in their solar searches, and we’re happy to have a few of his articles hosted here for others to find as the upcoming eclipses occur.

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Barlow Bob as captured at NEAF. Image courtesy of stargeezerradio.com.

2015march21_11069934_907214125998103_6014315920335880905_nFrom the “I wouldn’t have ever thought of that” department, and as an even more fun aside, the following image came across my Facebook feed courtesy of Stephen W. Ramsden, the main man behind the great Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project. Someone outside of The Feathers Inn in Stocksfield, UK captured the image at right (click the image for a larger view) of the eclipse being projected through a pasta strainer. A capital(-saving) idea!

And to show the importance of search terms to google, the searches for “eclipse strainer” and “eclipse colander” produce some very different results favoring the “eclipse colander” (for the purpose highlighted here, anyway). The UK version of the Huffington Post even featured an article for the March eclipse on their site (Solar Eclipse 2015 Sees The Humble Colander Come Into Its Own).

I think the kids below explain the procedure simply enough. One can only assume that some seriously ornate eclipse observing will happen if the Moon ever finds itself between the Sun and Tuscany.

2015march21_colander

This all remarks back to a point we cannot stress enough – Solar observing is fun, but definitely not a game! Never-never-never stare directly at the Sun through any kind of magnifying optics! Don’t noodle around if you don’t have proper filters – solar projection is the way to go. Just as Bob Piekiel and Larry Slosberg demonstrate below.