Tag Archives: Goto

For Sale In CNY – Meade Instruments 8″ LX90 EMC – $1000 or Best Offer

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

This in from the CNYO Classifieds section. To provide a level of privacy to the seller, please send me an email directly to info@cnyo.org and I’ll make the connecting email to the seller in a reply email.

The Meade 8″ LX90 is the first full capability, computer-controlled 8″ Schmidt-Cassegrain ever offered in its price range. The LX90 Schmidt-Cassegrain is not only a high-resolution visual observing instrument but also is fully qualified for the more advanced areas of astronomy, including long-exposure CCD-imaging and astrophotography.

Special features of the 8″ LX90 include: (a) a die-cast-aluminum double-tine fork mount that rigidly supports the optical tube in all sky orientations; (b) worm gears of 4.9″-diameter on both telescope axes that permit smooth sidereal-rate tracking of celestial objects as well as precise guiding corrections during longexposure imaging; (c) a chromed-steel variable-height tripod that provides all the rigidity required in sensitive field applications — in fact, the same tripod as provided with the Meade 8″ LX200GPS.

Autostar Computer Controller: The LX90’s standard-equipment Autostar controller connects to the telescope’s control panel and permits an incredible array of telescope options:

• Automatic GO TO capability at 6.5°/sec on both axes, simultaneously, to 30,223 database objects, including: 13,235 deep-sky objects sorted by named objects; galaxies; diffuse nebulae; planetary nebulae; star clusters; including the complete Messier, Caldwell, IC, and NGC catalogs; 16,800 stars sorted by name, SAO catalog numbers, double and variable stars; the centroids of the 88 constellations; plus 200 memory locations for user-defined objects. 50 objects in the solar system: 8 major planets from Mercury to Pluto; the Moon; 26 asteroids; 15 comets; 50 Earth satellites, including the International Space Station and Hubble telescope

• Automatic GO TO capability to any object of known RA and Declination. Nine selectable slew speeds: 6.5°/sec, 3°/sec, and 1.5°/sec, plus 128x, 64x, 16x, 8x, 2x, and 1x sidereal. • Control of the telescope through your personal computer, using the RS-232 serial interface. (Requires optional #505 Connector Cable Set.)*

• Fast alignment of the telescope in either equatorial or altazimuth modes using any of three alignment functions, including the Meade-proprietary Easy Align.

• Unlike the hand controllers included with competing 5″ and 8″ SCT’s (and which require disassembly of the telescope electronics for memory upgrade), Autostar is fully upgradeable over the Internet: add the positions of new comets, update the positions of Earth satellites,even add new software as it becomes available.

Celestron NexStar GOTO Mount For Sale In CNY

Greetings fellow astrophiles,

From the CNYO Classifieds Department – Local imaging instructor and astrophotographer extraordinaire Stephen Shaner (website) has available a like-new Celestron NexStar GOTO Mount. Details provided below. Interested parties should contact him at stephen@stephenshaner.com.

nexstar-8se-mountI have a Celestron NexStar goto mount I bought last summer and only used a handful of times before I bought a GEM for photography a few weeks later. The mount is basically new and I’d like to see it go to someone who will be able to use it.

This mount is suitable for an 8″ SCT or small refractor and fits any standard Vixen rail. There’s a database of 40,000 objects and the fantastic NexStar controller. It would be great for outreach work since it can run several hours off AA batteries or 12v (and I’m including the optional Celestron AC adapter), is very portable and only takes a few minutes to set up and align. It tracks very well. The mount, tripod and accessories are like new and in the original boxes. $275 if you pick it up at my place.

Observing Announcement: International Observe The Moon Night On The Syracuse Creekwalk – Saturday, Sept. 6 – 7 to 10 p.m.

Greetings fellow astrophiles!

Fellow CNYO’er and sidewalk astronomer extraordinaire Larry Slosberg has made the official announcement through our NASA Night Sky Network Page – we’ll be hosting the Central New York version of the International Observe The Moon Night (InOMN) along the Syracuse Creekwalk at our favorite downtown location – just south of Walt The Loch West Monster.

For those unfamiliar with InOMN, a brief word from the official website:

International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is an annual event that is dedicated to encouraging people to ‘look up’ and take notice of our nearest neighbor, the Moon. From looking at the Moon with a naked eye to using the most sensitive telescope, every year on the same day, people from around the world hold events and activities that celebrate our Moon. On this site, you can find information about an InOMN event near you or register your own event. We encourage everyone to join us in the celebration!

2014august28_logo_finalThe 12.5 day old waxing gibbous Moon is a nice compromise of brightness and detail for giving the Moon a good looking at. Not only will we have a terminator to give us shadows and perceived depth, but some of the great craters – Tycho, Copernicus, Kepler (just barely) and Plato – will be out in the open for inspection. For those wondering about the timing (besides the whole weekend thing), Full Moon is actually one of the most boring times to observe the Moon. With the Sun’s light beating straight down on the Moon’s surface, we have no shadows to bring out crater depth or mountain height. Most observers agree that the most interesting views are right along the terminator where light and dark meet, so having a nice piece of that to observe makes for a much more visually appealing session.


Our Creekwalk location between W. Fayette St. and Walton St.

We will be spending an inordinate amount of time staring at the near-full Moon through every scope or pair of binoculars anyone has interest in bringing. Those arriving early enough may even be able to take in a view of Saturn and Mars before they set below the Western city skyline. Those with GOTO’s (or heroic non-GOTO observers) may even be able to find Neptune, now at near-opposition, just to the Southeast.

And, for those who really want to feel the passage of the year this night, the brightest of all the Messier objects and great gems of the Winter, the Pleiades (M45), will be appearing just after 11 p.m. to our far east (meaning they’ll be above the buildings and possibly observable around midnight). This will be an even more impressive sight at our next North Sportman’s Club event!

We’ve meetup.com and Facebook events set up for the 6th, so feel free to make your presence known early. Otherwise, we hope to see you out and about on the evening of Saturday, September 6th!