Tag Archives: International Observe The Moon Night

“Upstate NY Stargazing In April” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the Upstate NY Stargazing series, “Upstate NY Stargazing in April: Comet Hunting and the Lyrid Meteor Shower,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com.

Direct Link: newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2017/03/…the_lyrid_meteor_shower.html

Direct Link: syracuse.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2017/03/…the_lyrid_meteor_shower.html

* We extend last month’s discussion of Messier Objects by briefly discussing the objects Messier was most keen on finding – comets. Many thanks to Brad Loperfido for the kind reprint permissions of his excellent Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak et al. catch (below).

Caption: One-hour motion of Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak (left) within Ursa Major, including M108 (the “Surfboard Galaxy”, upper right) and M97 (the Owl Nebula, lower right). (Image by NY photographer Brad Loperfido on March 22, 2017)

* We continue our look north with Ursa Minor, the second of six constellations that are always visible in the nighttime sky from our latitude (readers then can guess where the next four articles are headed).

* This month, we await the Lyrid Meteor Shower, which peaks on the early morning of April 22nd. The Lyrids peak in the presence of a sliver of a waning crescent Moon – this is excellent news for observers annoyed by the many washed-out 2016 meteor showers, as the Moon will not be bright enough to dull bright Lyrid trails.

Caption: The Lyrid Meteor Shower radiant, roughly between the bright star Vega and the southern elbow of Hercules. Pending the skies and brightness, you may even be able to see Comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak between the head of Draco and arm of Hercules that night. Click for a larger view.

“Upstate NY Stargazing In October” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the series, “Upstate NY stargazing in October: Prominent constellations of summer and winter visible on Autumn nights,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com. This month, we look for globular clusters in Hercules, and follow the recent progress of Mars, Saturn, and Venus – all while getting early sights of the very best of winter – Orion, Taurus, and the Pleiades.

Direct Link: newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/2016/10/…nights_offer_some_of_the_best.html

Direct Link: http://www.syracuse.com/outdoors/index.ssf/…nights_offer_some_of_the_best.html

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Caption: This photo, taken by a stationary camera at Mount Megantic National Park in Quebec, captured a fireball that shot over Montreal Wednesday night. The “bolide,” a rock entering Earth’s atmosphere, was seen across the Northeast. The Summer Triangle is shown as a red overlay. (ASTROLab du parc national du Mont-Megantic)

This article also marks the third official mention of our upcoming MOST/TACNY/CNYO hosting of International Observe The Moon Night on Saturday, October 8th. Additional details to follow, but expect the observing to happen somewhere around The MOST itself.

We’ll update the website and social media as we get a better idea on what the weather is supposed to do Saturday night (else we stay inside The MOST the entire time).

International Observe The Moon Night, October 8th – A Joint CNYO, TACNY, And MOST Event

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

2014august28_logo_finalWe’re now days away from the 2016 installment of International Observer the Moon Night (IOMN), and I’m very pleased to report that the session has become a joint effort between CNYO and TACNY, graciously hosted by Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology as part of a revamped “Sweet Lecture Series,” now to be known as “Sweet Science Series.” I, for one, am very happy that something akin to the good olde Cafe Scientifique Syracuse that used to be held downtown has returned to (nearly) the same location, and that the series has shifted to a greater community effort to educate on topics of scientific and engineering interest.

Interested parties can get a jump on the session’s focus by checking out CNYO’s brochure, A Guide For Lunar Observing. In the meantime, the official TACNY announcement is posted below – you can also register for the event on meetup.com.

Sweet Science Series

Join Us As We Celebrate NASA’s
International Observe The Moon Night

October 8, 7:00-9:00 pm
Milton J Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology (MOST)
500 S. Franklin Street, Syracuse

The Technology Alliance of Central New York (TACNY) has retooled our 103 year old Sweet Lecture Series! Now called the Sweet Science Series, the program is aimed at adults of all levels of technical understanding. Moving downtown to The MOST should make it easier to attend too! Future presentations will start earlier (5:30pm) too, with some time available to wander around the MOST, and be held the second Thursday of the month! If you have come before, check us out and tell us how you like the new format. If you’ve never been, now is the time to start participating!!

Damian Allis, director of CNY Observers and contributing astronomy writer for syracuse.com, will lead a discussion and observing session for NASA’s International Observe the Moon Night. The evening will start at 7 p.m. with snacks and the option to tour the MOST’s general exhibits for free. Attendees who wish to tour the museum’s new visiting exhibit, Nature’s Machines: Biomechanics, may pay a $5 per person surcharge. Dr. Allis will lead a discussion about the moon and night sky at 7:30 p.m., and everyone is invited outside at 8 p.m. to peer through telescopes and binoculars at the moon and stars (weather-permitting).

Dr. Allis is a Research Professor of Chemistry, Research Fellow with the Forensic and National Security Sciences Institute, bioinformaticist with AptaMatrix Inc., and High Performance Computing researcher, all at Syracuse University. He is a founding member and director of CNY Observers, monthly astronomy writer for syracuse.com and newyorkupstate.com, and a NASA Solar System Ambassador. More information about him can be found at his website.

Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by replying to this message or emailing sweet.lecture@tacny.org by Oct. 6. Parking is available on the street and in the lot behind the MOST.

ABOUT SWEET SCIENCE SERIES

TACNY John Edson Sweet Lectures, a program founded in 1913, is now called the Sweet Science Series and features discussions about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere for adults of all levels of technical understanding. A minimum of six free and open to the public presentations are held each year.

ABOUT TACNY

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.