Tag Archives: Iomn

“Upstate NY Stargazing In October” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the Upstate NY Stargazing series, “Upstate NY stargazing in October: The Orionids, International Observe the Moon Night,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com.

Direct Links: newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com

* Included this month are a reminder/announcement about Kopernik AstroFest 2017 (Oct. 13/14), International Observe the Moon Night on October 28th, and the Orionids:

The Orionids are the most prominent meteor shower in October, but ride near the bottom of the top-10 list of active showers for the year. Observers simply interested in seeing any shooting stars do benefit from the Orionids peaking at a time of year when a number of less significant meteor showers are also active, including one of the Geminids and two Taurids showers. This year, the grouping of active showers around the Orionids peak benefit greatly from the absence of the Moon during the 20th-21st peak.

* With Orion out and about at a reasonable hour, the Orion-star-finder has been brought back from the UNY Stargazing archives:

Caption:Orion can guide you around its neighborhood. Red = belt stars to Sirius and Canis Major; Orange = Rigel and belt center to Castor and Pollux in Gemini; Yellow = Bellatrix and Betelgeuse to Canis Major; Green = Belt stars to Aldebaran and Taurus; Blue = Saiph and Orion’s head to Capella in Auriga. Click for a larger view.

* The pre-sunrise mornings continue to provide excellent planetary viewing of Mars and Venus, with several notable arrangements occurring this month:

Caption:The prominent planetary groupings in the morning sky this month. Click for a larger view.

* And, finally, we finish up the circumpolar constellations with Camelopardalis before going briefly into what circumpolar constellations are in the November article:

Caption: Camelopardalis and its more prominent neighbors. (Image made with Stellarium)

International Observe The Moon Night, October 8th – A Joint CNYO, TACNY, And MOST Event

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

2014august28_logo_finalWe’re now days away from the 2016 installment of International Observer the Moon Night (IOMN), and I’m very pleased to report that the session has become a joint effort between CNYO and TACNY, graciously hosted by Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology as part of a revamped “Sweet Lecture Series,” now to be known as “Sweet Science Series.” I, for one, am very happy that something akin to the good olde Cafe Scientifique Syracuse that used to be held downtown has returned to (nearly) the same location, and that the series has shifted to a greater community effort to educate on topics of scientific and engineering interest.

Interested parties can get a jump on the session’s focus by checking out CNYO’s brochure, A Guide For Lunar Observing. In the meantime, the official TACNY announcement is posted below – you can also register for the event on meetup.com.

Sweet Science Series

Join Us As We Celebrate NASA’s
International Observe The Moon Night

October 8, 7:00-9:00 pm
Milton J Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology (MOST)
500 S. Franklin Street, Syracuse

The Technology Alliance of Central New York (TACNY) has retooled our 103 year old Sweet Lecture Series! Now called the Sweet Science Series, the program is aimed at adults of all levels of technical understanding. Moving downtown to The MOST should make it easier to attend too! Future presentations will start earlier (5:30pm) too, with some time available to wander around the MOST, and be held the second Thursday of the month! If you have come before, check us out and tell us how you like the new format. If you’ve never been, now is the time to start participating!!

Damian Allis, director of CNY Observers and contributing astronomy writer for syracuse.com, will lead a discussion and observing session for NASA’s International Observe the Moon Night. The evening will start at 7 p.m. with snacks and the option to tour the MOST’s general exhibits for free. Attendees who wish to tour the museum’s new visiting exhibit, Nature’s Machines: Biomechanics, may pay a $5 per person surcharge. Dr. Allis will lead a discussion about the moon and night sky at 7:30 p.m., and everyone is invited outside at 8 p.m. to peer through telescopes and binoculars at the moon and stars (weather-permitting).

Dr. Allis is a Research Professor of Chemistry, Research Fellow with the Forensic and National Security Sciences Institute, bioinformaticist with AptaMatrix Inc., and High Performance Computing researcher, all at Syracuse University. He is a founding member and director of CNY Observers, monthly astronomy writer for syracuse.com and newyorkupstate.com, and a NASA Solar System Ambassador. More information about him can be found at his website.

Walk-ins are welcome, but we ask that people RSVP by replying to this message or emailing sweet.lecture@tacny.org by Oct. 6. Parking is available on the street and in the lot behind the MOST.

ABOUT SWEET SCIENCE SERIES

TACNY John Edson Sweet Lectures, a program founded in 1913, is now called the Sweet Science Series and features discussions about topics in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in an informal atmosphere for adults of all levels of technical understanding. A minimum of six free and open to the public presentations are held each year.

ABOUT TACNY

Founded in 1903 as the Technology Club of Syracuse, the nonprofit Technology Alliance of Central New York’s mission is to facilitate community awareness, appreciation, and education of technology; and to collaborate with like-minded organizations across Central New York.

“Stargazing In Upstate NY In September” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the series, “Stargazing in Upstate NY in September: Look for more subtle objects on autumn nights,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com. Among other topics, this article continues our exploration of the Summer Triangle, using Vega (for the easy find) and Lyra to guide new observers to a few binocular highlights in the late-Summer sky.

Direct Link: newyorkupstate.com/outdoors/…for_more_subtle_objects_on_autumn_nig.html

This article also marks the first official mention (to the best of my knowledge) of our upcoming MOST/TACNY/CNYO hosting of International Observe The Moon Night on Saturday, October 8th. Additional details to follow, but expect the observing to happen somewhere around The MOST itself.

image_1__2016sept_smdomecomposite

Extra-special thanks to Nick Lamendola from the Astronomy Section of the Rochester Academy of Science (image above, taken from the grounds of Farash Center – click for a larger view) for the use of his Perseid composite as the article opener.