Tag Archives: Nasa

International Observe The Moon Night Quarterly Newsletter And 2020 Announcement

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The IOMN organizers have sent off their first quarterly newsletter for 2020 (reproduced below), including the announcement of the IOMN scheduling for 26 September 2020.

You can download a summary PDF at: INOMN_One_Pager_2019-2020.pdf


Thank you for a RECORD BREAKING 2019!

We are pleased to report that International Observe the Moon Night 2019 broke all previous participation records. We had 1,892 public and private events in 102 countries! There were over 650 events in the United States, which included all 50 states, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. We estimate that over 255,000 people attended International Observe the Moon Night events!

It is thanks to hosts and participants like YOU that we had such a record breaking year. Thanks for being a part of this global, lunar enthusiast community.

Learn more about the 2019 event.

Save the Date: September 26, 2020

Save the Date postcards for International Observe the Moon Night 2020 are now available. We are hard at work translating the postcard into additional languages, so be sure to check the website periodically.

Learn more about NASA’s Moon to Mars program, how we are working to push the boundaries of science and exploration, and return astronauts to the Moon with the Artemis program. Click on the image above to learn how technicians and engineers are planning to use 3D printed materials to help send cargo to the Moon’s atmosphere with NASA’s Space Launch System.

Join the Conversation

International Observe the Moon Night is a wonderful chance to connect with Moon fans around the world.  Learn updates and connect to fellow lunar enthusiasts around the world by following @NASAMoon on Twitter, visiting the International Observe the Moon Night Facebook page, and catching up on event photos on the 2019 International Observe the Moon Night group on Flickr.

Summerwood Pediatrics Presents: “Be The Astronomer” At The MOST, 30 June 2018

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

A great event happening at The MOST at the end of the month from noon to 4:00 p.m.:

Be the Scientist” Saturdays allow visitors to learn, engage, and explore the activities of a different type of scientist each month. Visitors receive an explorer card to track progress through the program’s three steps: Learn, Engage, Explore. Step 1 (Learn) features a tabling exercise teaching the basic principles of the monthly scientist’s discipline. Visitors move to a different location for Step 2 (Engage), which features a tabling exercise including hands-on interaction in an activity the scientist might undertake in real life. Finally, visitors encounter Step 3 (Explore), which is an exploration of a MOST exhibit relating to the work of the monthly scientist. Make your way through each step successfully and have your explorer card punched to mark your completion. Complete 12 sessions to earn your special mystery prize! All are welcome to participate! Most suitable for children ages 6 and up.

June 30 – Be the Astronomer
July 28 – Be the Marine Biologist
August 25 – Be the Geologist
September 29 – Be the Nutritionist (Food & Exercise)

With luck, the touring Hubble exhibit will be available at the same time:

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope: New Views of the Universe is a 2,200 square-foot exhibit that immerses visitors in the magnificence and mystery of the Hubble mission and introduces the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be NASA’s premier observatory. The exhibit features a scale model of the Hubble Space Telescope as well as several “satellite” units that provide viewers with a hands-on experience with the same technology that allows Hubble to gaze at distant galaxies, and feature Hubble’s contributions to the exploration of planets, stars, galaxies and the universe.

NASA Space Place – Studying Storms From The Sky

Poster’s Note: One of the many under-appreciated aspects of NASA is the extent to which it publishes quality science content for children and Ph.D.’s alike. NASA Space Place has been providing general audience articles for quite some time that are freely available for download and republishing. Your tax dollars help promote science! The following article was provided for reprinting in November, 2017.

By Teagan Wall

2013february2_spaceplaceThe United States had a rough hurricane season this year. Scientists collect information before and during hurricanes to understand the storms and help people stay safe. However, collecting information during a violent storm is very difficult.

Hurricanes are constantly changing. This means that we need a lot of really precise data about the storm. It’s pretty hard to learn about hurricanes while inside the storm, and instruments on the ground can be broken by high winds and flooding. One solution is to study hurricanes from above. NASA and NOAA can use satellites to keep an eye on storms that are difficult to study on the ground.

In Puerto Rico, Hurricane Maria was so strong that it knocked out radar before it even hit land. Radar can be used to predict a storm’s path and intensity—and without radar, it is difficult to tell how intense a storm will be. Luckily, scientists were able to use information from a weather satellite called GOES-16, short for Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – 16.

The “G” in GOES-16 stands for geostationary. This means that the satellite is always above the same place on the Earth, so during Hurricane Maria, it never lost sight of the storm. GOES-16’s job as a weather satellite hasn’t officially started yet, but it was collecting information and was able to help.

From 22,000 miles above Earth, GOES-16 watched Hurricane Maria, and kept scientists on the ground up to date. Knowing where a storm is—and what it’s doing—can help keep people safe, and get help to the people that need it.

Hurricanes can also have a huge impact on the environment—even after they’re gone. To learn about how Hurricane Irma affected the Florida coast, scientists used images from an environmental satellite called Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, or Suomi-NPP. One of the instruments on this satellite, called VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite), took pictures of Florida before and after the Hurricane.

Hurricane Irma was so big and powerful, that it moved massive amounts of dirt, water and pollution. The information captured by VIIRS can tell scientists how and where these particles are moving in the water. This can help with recovery efforts, and help us design better ways to prepare for hurricanes in the future.

By using satellites like GOES-16 and Suomi-NPP to observe severe storms, researchers and experts stay up to date in a safe and fast way. The more we know about hurricanes, the more effectively we can protect people and the environment from them in the future.

To learn more about hurricanes, check out NASA Space Place: spaceplace.nasa.gov/hurricanes/

This article was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Caption: These images of Florida and the Bahamas were captured by a satellite called Suomi-NPP. The image on the left was taken before Hurricane Irma and the image on the right was taken after the hurricane. The light color along the coast is dirt, sand and garbage brought up by the storm. Image credit: NASA/NOAA

About NASA Space Place

With articles, activities, crafts, games, and lesson plans, NASA Space Place encourages everyone to get excited about science and technology. Visit spaceplace.nasa.gov (facebook|twitter) to explore space and Earth science!