Tag Archives: Solar Eclipse

The August 21st Solar Eclipse From Central/Upstate NY – Scheduled Lectures And Observing

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The time is finally approaching – but, before the anxiously-awaited total solar eclipse over New York on April 8th of 2024 (this is true!), we’ve another solar eclipse that will include partial coverage of the Sun by the Moon from our location this coming August 21st afternoon (plan to make yourself available from roughly 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.).

In preparation for the eclipse, CNYO will be hosting a number of lectures in the area and, for the actual observing session of the eclipse, CNYO members will be at a number of local libraries with solar-safe observing equipment. Additional sessions will be added to this page as events get scheduled.

Scheduled Lectures (Same Presentation, Different Locations):

NOPL North Syracuse, August 14th, 6:30 p.m.

* 100 Trolley Barn Ln, North Syracuse, NY 13212, nopl.org, (315) 458-6184
* Event listing on meetup and facebook

Cazenovia Public Library, August 16th, 7:00 p.m.

* 100 Albany St, Cazenovia, NY 13035, cazenoviapubliclibrary.org, (315) 655-9322
* Event listing on meetup and facebook

Jamesville Public Library, August 21st, 12:00 p.m.

* 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville, NY 13078, (315) 446-3578 (DeWitt Branch)
* Event listing on meetup and facebook
* The Jamesville Library lecture will combine several events into one – a noon lecture, followed by the afternoon observing the the eclipse, all as part of the opening of this brand-new library on Jamesville Rd.

Observing Sessions, August 21st (1 to 4 p.m.) (Same Eclipse, Different Locations):

Liverpool Public Library – Observing with Christopher Schuck

* 310 Tulip St, Liverpool, NY 13088, www.lpl.org, (315) 457-0310
* Event listing at library, meetup and facebook

Marcellus Free Library – Observing with Bob Piekiel

* 32 Maple St, Marcellus, NY 13108, mflib.org, (315) 673-3221
* Event listing at library, meetup and facebook

Jamesville Public Library – Observing with Damian Allis

* 5110 Jamesville Road, Jamesville, NY 13078, (315) 446-3578 (DeWitt Branch)
* Event listing on meetup and facebook

If you have solar-safe observing equipment and would like to include your setup at one of these sessions, or if you plan on hosting an eclipse event in the CNY area and would like to be added to the lecture or observing list, please contact Damian at info@cnyo.org.

“Upstate NY Stargazing In May” Article Posted To newyorkupstate.com And syracuse.com

Greetings, fellow astrophiles!

The latest article in the Upstate NY Stargazing series, “Upstate NY Stargazing in May: A Meteor Shower and Preparations for the Solar Eclipse,” has just been posted to newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com.

Direct Links: newyorkupstate.com and syracuse.com

* With only four articles to go before the great total solar eclipse on August 21st of this year, we’ve shifted gears in the article opener from great nighttime observing to great daytime observing. You’ll be seeing more and more from all kinds of news sources as the data approaches, and CNYO is figuring out what we plan to do for the event (besides a few scheduled eclipses lectures in the CNY area in the weeks before).

For the record, amateur astronomers reserved their rooms years and years ago in all the best places – if you’ve not figured out your flight plans around the 21st already, there is a seriously good chance that you’ll be stick driving to see the best view of totality.

Caption: The transit of Venus across the Sun on June 5/6, 2012. By NASA/SDO, AIA.

* We continue our look north with Cassiopeia, the third of six constellations that are always visible in the nighttime sky from our latitude (readers then can guess where the next three articles are headed).

* This month, we await the Eta Aquariid (or Eta Aquarid, or eta Aquarid… Halley’s Comet doesn’t care what you call it) Meteor Shower, which peaks on the early mornings of May 5/6. In doing the homework for the article, I found it interesting to note that we’re not entirely sure that this meteor shower originates from particles attributable to Halley’s Comet, the object we most associate with this shower. It is possible that Halley’s Comet is indirectly responsible for the particles by being directly responsible for the redirection of the debris from a different object in to the current Eta Aquariid path.

Caption: The Eta Aquariid radiant, complete with Venus, Saturn, the newly returned Summer Triangle, and one perfectly-placed 5 a.m. ISS flyover on the morning of May 6. Image made with Stellarium. Click for a larger view.

NASA Space Place – Solar Eclipse Provides Coronal Glimpse

Poster’s Note: One of the many under-appreciated aspects of NASA is the extent to which it publishes quality science content for children and Ph.D.’s alike. NASA Space Place has been providing general audience articles for quite some time that are freely available for download and republishing. Your tax dollars help promote science! The following article was provided for reprinting in February, 2017.

By Marcus Woo

2013february2_spaceplaceOn August 21, 2017, North Americans will enjoy a rare treat: The first total solar eclipse visible from the continent since 1979. The sky will darken and the temperature will drop, in one of the most dramatic cosmic events on Earth. It could be a once-in-a-lifetime show indeed. But it will also be an opportunity to do some science.

Only during an eclipse, when the moon blocks the light from the sun’s surface, does the sun’s corona fully reveal itself. The corona is the hot and wispy atmosphere of the sun, extending far beyond the solar disk. But it’s relatively dim, merely as bright as the full moon at night. The glaring sun, about a million times brighter, renders the corona invisible.

“The beauty of eclipse observations is that they are, at present, the only opportunity where one can observe the corona [in visible light] starting from the solar surface out to several solar radii,” says Shadia Habbal, an astronomer at the University of Hawaii. To study the corona, she’s traveled the world having experienced 14 total eclipses (she missed only five due to weather). This summer, she and her team will set up identical imaging systems and spectrometers at five locations along the path of totality, collecting data that’s normally impossible to get.

Ground-based coronagraphs, instruments designed to study the corona by blocking the sun, can’t view the full extent of the corona. Solar space-based telescopes don’t have the spectrographs needed to measure how the temperatures vary throughout the corona. These temperature variations show how the sun’s chemical composition is distributed—crucial information for solving one of long-standing mysteries about the corona: how it gets so hot.

While the sun’s surface is ~9980 Fahrenheit (~5800 Kelvin), the corona can reach several millions of degrees Fahrenheit. Researchers have proposed many explanations involving magneto-acoustic waves and the dissipation of magnetic fields, but none can account for the wide-ranging temperature distribution in the corona, Habbal says.

You too can contribute to science through one of several citizen science projects. For example, you can also help study the corona through the Citizen CATE experiment; help produce a high definition, time-expanded video of the eclipse; use your ham radio to probe how an eclipse affects the propagation of radio waves in the ionosphere; or even observe how wildlife responds to such a unique event.

Otherwise, Habbal still encourages everyone to experience the eclipse. Never look directly at the sun, of course (find more safety guidelines here: eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety). But during the approximately 2.5 minutes of totality, you may remove your safety glasses and watch the eclipse directly—only then can you see the glorious corona. So enjoy the show. The next one visible from North America won’t be until 2024.

For more information about the upcoming eclipse, please see:

NASA Eclipse citizen science page: eclipse2017.nasa.gov/citizen-science

NASA Eclipse safety guidelines: eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety

Want to teach kids about eclipses? Go to the NASA Space Place and see our article on solar and lunar eclipses! spaceplace.nasa.gov/eclipses/

This article was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Caption: Illustration showing the United States during the total solar eclipse of August 21, 2017, with the umbra (black oval), penumbra (concentric shaded ovals), and path of totality (red) through or very near several major cities. Credit: Goddard Science Visualization Studio, NASA

About NASA Space Place

With articles, activities, crafts, games, and lesson plans, NASA Space Place encourages everyone to get excited about science and technology. Visit spaceplace.nasa.gov (facebook|twitter) to explore space and Earth science!